Concert Works and Orchestral Excerpts

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CSO Low Brass--1971 Section
Jay Friedman, James Gilbertsen, Frank Crisafulli and Edward Kleinhammer, trombones, Arnold Jacobs, tuba

This recording was made in 1971 for the purpose of providing students, teachers and music lovers in general with a better aural perspective of the trombone and tuba section of a great symphony orchestra. It is perhaps the first attempt to present the sound of an orchestral section playing the standard orchestral excerpts, thus enabling the listener to hear the professional orchestral approach to sound, style, phrasing and other musical problems in greater detail. In addition, it was felt that the considerable body of fine original literature for trombones and tuba deserved attention. It is hoped that this record will provide a source of inspiration to the young players, a stimulation of interest in the literature and playing style on the part of the teacher, and an enjoyable, aural and musical experience for all listeners.

On this recording, Mr. Friedman plays First Trombone; Mr. Gilbertsen plays second trombone on those pieces requiring four trombones; Mr. Crisafulli plays the second part on those pieces requiring three trombones and the third part on those requiring four; Mr. Kleinhammer plays bass trombone on all selections.

This recording was made in July 1971 at Lederer Hall, Temple Emanuel, in Chicago. Joseph Kreines produced the recording, and Norman Pellegrini engineered it. Once levels had been set for the three Sony microphones employed, they remained unchanged throughout the sessions. The only alteration in microphone placement occurred when pieces without tuba were recorded. The participants wish to thank Temple Emanuel for their generous cooperation in making their facilities available for this recording. This CD has been remastered by Konrad Strauss.
Program Notes by Joseph Kreines

Contents
• Wagner — Ride of the Valkyries from Die Walküre (full ensemble). Well-known as an orchestral showpiece, and difficult to play with rhythmic accuracy, good intonation and tonal control at extreme volumes.
• Holst — Mars from The Planets (full ensemble). A fine example of brass choir sound with an important part for the tenor tuba (euphonium).
• Mahler — Fifth Movement excerpt from Symphony No. 2 (Resurrection) (full ensemble). A chorale-like passage featuring rich harmonic texture and wide dynamic range, showing Mahler as perhaps the most imaginative composer of brass orchestral writing.
• Tchaikovsky — Excerpt from 1812 Overture (3 trombones, tuba). A good example of the big full-sounding Tchaikovsky. Note the marcato style, which should be clearly articulated but never edgy-sounding.
• Verdi — Introduction to Nabucco Overture (3 trombones, tuba). Simple but beautiful harmony, setting a noble, eloquent mood.
• Wagner — Excerpts from Wotan's Farewell and Magic Fire Music, from Die Walküre (full ensemble). These were the most difficult of all the excerpts. A demonstration of soft, sustained passages requiring the ultimate in control, finesse and musicianship.
• Mahler — First Movement excerpt from Symphony No. 3 (full ensemble). A martial, heroic episode emphasizing the dramatic power and intensity of the brass.
• Glière — First Movement excerpts from Ilya Mourometz (Symphony No. 3) (full ensemble). This track provides the contrast of very soft and loud versions of the same music in a majestic setting.
• Bruckner — First Movement excerpts from Symphony No. 4 (Romantic) (3 trombones, tuba). These, and the excerpts on track 12 are among the best examples of the chorale-like, epic style of Bruckner's brass writing. Particular attention should be paid to the style of attack and the overall sound-concept which are essential to producing the correct musical results.
• Tchaikovsky — Fourth Movement excerpt from Symphony No. 6 (Pathètique) (3 trombones, tuba). One of the most beautiful soft-chord passages, requiring great care in attacks, release and balance.
• Wagner — Prelude to Act 3 of Lohengrin (3 trombones, tuba). A challenge to any brass section for precision, clarity and balance.
• Bruckner — Fourth Movement excerpts from Symphony No. 8 (3 trombones, tuba). See note for track 9.
• Smetana — Excerpt from The Moldau (3 trombones, tuba). A famous passage demonstrating the wonderfully mysterious aspect of soft-brass sound. This excerpt requires clarity and firmness of rhythm despite the soft volume.
• Berlioz — Rakoczy March Finale from The Damnation of Faust (3 trombones, tuba). This well-known passage provides plenty of technical challenge and it also demands accurate rhythmic placement and good control of sound.
• Wagner — Finale of Tannhäuser Overture (3 Trombones, Tuba). One of the most impressive orchestral climaxes is also a fine vehicle for both unison and chordal sounds by the low brass choir.
• Brahms — Chorale-Prelude No. 8, Es Ist Ein Ros'Entsprungen (arranged by Fote, published by Kendor Music Co.) (Full Ensemble). Originally for organ, this beautiful rich-textured work has been well-transcribed for trombones and tuba. It is particularly demanding in terms of phrasing and feeling of the long line.
• Tomasi — Être ou ne pas être (To Be Or Not To Be) after Hamlet's monologue (published by Alphonse Leduc). A fascinating, rather unusual work with a recitative-like solo tuba line against a trombone-trio accompaniment, providing the tuba with an opportunity to show its capacity for a vocal-like style.
• Kreines — Chorale Variations (published by Kagarice Brass Editions) (Full Ensemble). An original work especially composed for this group, using Jesu meine Freude as the theme, with five variations on contrasting moods and tempi (a lyric, flowing line; a toccata; a funeral dirge; a cadenza-like variation with solos for each player) and a coda.
• Bozza — Three Pieces for trombone quartet (published by Alphonse Leduc) A very difficult and demanding work with much virtuoso writing for all four players, but highly enjoyable to work on.
Contents
• Wagner — Ride of the Valkyries from Die Walküre (full ensemble). Well-known as an orchestral showpiece, and difficult to play with rhythmic accuracy, good intonation and tonal control at extreme volumes.
• Holst — Mars from The Planets (full ensemble). A fine example of brass choir sound with an important part for the tenor tuba (euphonium).
• Mahler — Fifth Movement excerpt from Symphony No. 2 (Resurrection) (full ensemble). A chorale-like passage featuring rich harmonic texture and wide dynamic range, showing Mahler as perhaps the most imaginative composer of brass orchestral writing.
• Tchaikovsky — Excerpt from 1812 Overture (3 trombones, tuba). A good example of the big full-sounding Tchaikovsky. Note the marcato style, which should be clearly articulated but never edgy-sounding.
• Verdi — Introduction to Nabucco Overture (3 trombones, tuba). Simple but beautiful harmony, setting a noble, eloquent mood.
• Wagner — Excerpts from Wotan's Farewell and Magic Fire Music, from Die Walküre (full ensemble). These were the most difficult of all the excerpts. A demonstration of soft, sustained passages requiring the ultimate in control, finesse and musicianship.
• Mahler — First Movement excerpt from Symphony No. 3 (full ensemble). A martial, heroic episode emphasizing the dramatic power and intensity of the brass.
• Glière — First Movement excerpts from Ilya Mourometz (Symphony No. 3) (full ensemble). This track provides the contrast of very soft and loud versions of the same music in a majestic setting.
• Bruckner — First Movement excerpts from Symphony No. 4 (Romantic) (3 trombones, tuba). These, and the excerpts on track 12 are among the best examples of the chorale-like, epic style of Bruckner's brass writing. Particular attention should be paid to the style of attack and the overall sound-concept which are essential to producing the correct musical results.
• Tchaikovsky — Fourth Movement excerpt from Symphony No. 6 (Pathètique) (3 trombones, tuba). One of the most beautiful soft-chord passages, requiring great care in attacks, release and balance.
• Wagner — Prelude to Act 3 of Lohengrin (3 trombones, tuba). A challenge to any brass section for precision, clarity and balance.
• Bruckner — Fourth Movement excerpts from Symphony No. 8 (3 trombones, tuba). See note for track 9.
• Smetana — Excerpt from The Moldau (3 trombones, tuba). A famous passage demonstrating the wonderfully mysterious aspect of soft-brass sound. This excerpt requires clarity and firmness of rhythm despite the soft volume.
• Berlioz — Rakoczy March Finale from The Damnation of Faust (3 trombones, tuba). This well-known passage provides plenty of technical challenge and it also demands accurate rhythmic placement and good control of sound.
Wagner — Finale of Tannhäuser Overture (3 Trombones, Tuba). One of the most impressive orchestral climaxes is also a fine vehicle for both unison and chordal sounds by the low brass choir.

• Brahms — Chorale-Prelude No. 8, Es Ist Ein Ros'Entsprungen (arranged by Fote, published by Kendor Music Co.) (Full Ensemble). Originally for organ, this beautiful rich-textured work has been well-transcribed for trombones and tuba. It is particularly demanding in terms of phrasing and feeling of the long line.
• Tomasi — Être ou ne pas être (To Be Or Not To Be) after Hamlet's monologue (published by Alphonse Leduc). A fascinating, rather unusual work with a recitative-like solo tuba line against a trombone-trio accompaniment, providing the tuba with an opportunity to show its capacity for a vocal-like style.
• Kreines — Chorale Variations (published by Kagarice Brass Editions) (Full Ensemble). An original work especially composed for this group, using Jesu meine Freude as the theme, with five variations on contrasting moods and tempi (a lyric, flowing line; a toccata; a funeral dirge; a cadenza-like variation with solos for each player) and a coda.
Bozza — Three Pieces for trombone quartet (published by Alphonse Leduc) A very difficult and demanding work with much virtuoso writing for all four players, but highly enjoyable to work on.

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  • Model: CD001